Introduction

The Medical Coding and Billing program covers the basic knowledge and skills required to become a Medical Biller and/or Coder including foundational courses in health insurance and diagnostic and procedural coding. Students complete coursework in the main medical diagnostic coding (ICD) and procedure coding (CPT) systems, as well as, medical terminology, computerized medical billing and health insurance applications.

Role as a Medical Biller & Coder

Medical Billers and Coders can specialize in coding patients medical information for reimbursement purposes, or in the facilitys administrative billing process. Technicians, who specialize in coding, assign a code to each diagnosis and procedure by using classification systems software. The classification system determines the amount for which healthcare providers will be reimbursed if the patient is covered by Medicare, Medicaid, or other insurance programs using the system. There are several coding systems, such as those required for ambulatory settings, physician offices, or long-term care. Technicians, who specialize in the billing process, typically use an automated medical billing and administrative system that interfaces with the insurance programs used by the facility. In a smaller medical facility where the medical procedures performed are limited, a Technicians duties may include both coding and billing.

Career Outlook

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) released their 2013 Occupational Outlook Handbook and the field of medical records and health information technicians (which includes medical billers and coders) is expected to increase by 21% between 2010 and 2020.

With the increase in the nations aging population, along with the implementation of ICD-10 in 2014, there is and will continue to be an added demand for medical billing and coding professionals to assist the provider community with the increase in patient encounters and medical chart reviews that will require the services of these highly trained professionals.